Sound, Lights, Rigging/Safety

3 Days of Intensive Training

REGISTRATION OPENS APRIL 29, 2016

Register for USITT's 3 days of training August 17, 18 and 19, 2016 in Las Vegas, Nevada. Industry professionals and recognized trainers will bring you hands-on intensive training in three different areas of focus over three days.

DAY ONE - SOUND

August 17, 2016, 9am - 4pm (with an hour for lunch)

Curriculum to be covered (but not limited too)

Industry Standard Terms - Make sure you are using standard terms the Entertainment Industry relies on.
Parts and Equipment Identification - There are standard connectors, cables and equipment designed and wired to be universal, cover what they are, what they do, and where they go in relation to your sound system.  Open standard connectors and see what makes them tick and learn how to do basic repairs and keep them maintained.  Hear how to use the equipment you have to its fullest potential as stated by manufacturer specs. Learn about the latest technology and how you may be able to incorporate some of it into your events.
Sound Math? - Equipment specifications, cones, angles and amps... A drop in or overload of current can cause a variable in your sound re-enforcement. Electricity in relation to the position of your equipment can cause buzz, hum or feedback. Learn how basic equations can keep your system sounding crisp and clear. 
The Sound Plot - Most of your system is probably permanently in place, rigged, hung and stacked.  Have you ever hid a speaker in the scenery? Have you ever placed delays in the house? Find out how to enhance segments of your performance without breaking your budget.
Design - Set the mood with sound. Can I find free sound bites and effects on-line? Are their licensing agreements on the effects your running?  What else can you accomplish with your design when you are limited on time or experience? How can I set up my board-op not to fail?  What's the best way to record and store your Q's? Does anyone ever use live sound effects any more? Is there software or programs we should think about incorporating?
The Sound Board (and other parts) -  What do all those knobs and sliders do? Are there presets we can start with until we learn more? What kind of effects can I use the board for? Should we attach to a CD Player, an iPOD or some other playback device?  What basic sound operator functions should we get in the habit of doing every time? 
Acoustics, I can't change them, can I? What should you know about your space,the shape, size, building materials,temperature and even the paint play a role. The size of your audience each night can have tremendous impact on volume, learn rules you can follow to make sure everyone can hear every time?
eSET  - Essential Skills for Entertainment Technicians - USITT recently finished basic and early career tests in three areas of focus, Lighting & ElectricsRigging, and Costuming along with a pre-requisite test component called Basic Skills and Safety. Learn how all the terms gathered and used for these tests are available in apps for your iPhone and Android devices. For the last hour of the day, take the Basic Terms and Safety test with your fellow registrants. It is a test with a 40 minute time limit but we'll leave time for discussion and review post results.

DAY TWO - LIGHTING

August 18, 2016, 9am-4pm (with an hour for lunch) 

Curriculum to be covered (but not limited too)

Industry Standard Terms - Make sure you are using standard terms the Entertainment Industry relies on.
Parts and Equipment Identification - There are standard connectors, cables and equipment designed and wired to be universal, cover what they are, what they do, and where they go in relation to your system. Open standard connectors and see what makes them tick and learn how to do basic repairs and keep them safe. Learn about the latest technology and how you may be able to incorporate some of it into your events.
Electricity and Math - Learn the standard equations and how to use your system correctly according to your equipment and electrical limitations. Learning and employing the use of a multi-meter can often take the guess work out. Safe practices and what tasks you can accomplish or shouldn't mess with will be explained and discussed.
The Light Plot - Mapping your design in advance enables best practice methods, communication and safety. View a standard light plot. Learn how to read and design one for your specific needs.
Hang and Focus - Hang and circuit a small plot. Use the math portion from an earlier in the day to build safe loads for your circuits while retaining the most flexibility in your design. Learn the safe practices required to fly lighting equipment above your stage.  (Day three of this training will delve deeper into safe practices and rigging fundamentals) Learn how to accomplish the most at ground level and reduce the time of working at heights.
Design - Even with all the newest fixtures on the market most theaters still employ the basic ones. Where to place and how best to use your Leko's (Ellipsoidal Reflector Spotlights), Fresnels, Par Cans and Strip Lights. Fixture position, angle and color can set mood, time of day, highlight and give "punch" to actors, scenes, or scenery all while covering and filling the space you need to with the inventory you have.
The Light Board - The tool behind your design.There are many light boards on the market so there is no longer a typical standard. However, terminology and outcome tend to remain the same. Discuss with your instructor the lingo and how to communicate it efficiently and effectively. Receive advice on how to update your skills on your particular board.
eSET - Essential Skills for Entertainment Technicians - USITT recently finished basic and early career tests in three areas of focus, Lighting & ElectricsRigging, and Costuming along with a pre-requisite test component called Basic Skills and Safety.  For the last hour of the day, take the Lighting & Electrics test with your fellow registrants. It is a test with a 40 minute time limit but we'll leave time for discussion and review post results.

Note: The attendee should be prepared to bring gloves and a adjustable wrench (C-Wrench)

DAY THREE - RIGGING/SAFETY (or should we say safety and rigging? You can't have one without the other and safety HAS TO COME FIRST)

August 19, 2016 9am-4pm (with an hour for lunch)

Curriculum to be covered (but not limited too)

This is a hands on learning experience for each attendee so that theory is translated to practice under the supervision of Internationally recognized trainers.

Industry Standard Terms - Make sure you are using standard terms the Entertainment Industry relies on.
Basic Rigging Tools and Hardware - You've had hands-on at ground level running the lines but what about the rest of this structure. Learn to properly identify the parts of the counter weight system and know what their roll is in the overall scheme of the design.
Safe Operation of Counterweight Fly Systems - You've identified the parts, are you using them properly? Are you passing on safe operation practices to your crew? Are there railings and fall protections in place?  Are you using proper call-outs or "warnings" when work is being performed overhead or a batten is moving? Get hands-on instruction for operating your system correctly.
How to Safely Rig and Fly Scenery - Knots, rope and wire rope, are you using the correct types? Are you preparing the hardware and scenery correctly? You don't have a traditional fly-space, are there other ways to "fly"?  All these new musicals are "flying" characters, how can you do that? The answer is, you can't without help. Always hire a professional and complete service provider for all your flying effects. Your theatrical licensing agent can recommend a company to use before you apply for a license but if not, contact USITT for resources that may be available in your region.
Basic Maintenance of Rigging Systems Day to Day and Why Professional Inspections are Important - What you can do yourself and what you should rely on the professionals for, the list of do's and don'ts.
Safety Procedures for Working at Heights and Using Ladders 
Basic Rules for Fall Protection 
- Rigging and working at height accidents are often catastrophic. Do not let yourself or one of your crew become a statistic. 
eSET - Essential Skills for Entertainment Technicians - USITT recently finished basic and early career tests in three areas of focus, Lighting & ElectricsRigging, and Costuming along with a pre-requisite test component called Basic Skills and Safety. For the last hour of the day, take the Rigging test with your fellow registrants. It is a test with a 40 minute time limit but we'll leave time for discussion and review post results.

Note: The attendee should be prepared to bring gloves.

REGISTRATION INFORMATION
$100 per day, per attendee
or,
$270 for all three days

Instructors will be Professionals and USITT affiliates. 
 

REGISTRATION OPENS APRIL 29, 2016