ETCP Renewal Credits

Online learning with ETCP Renewal Credits

 

This course is Part 1 of a 4-part series.

The purpose of this course is to introduce you to the field of structural engineering. The course will cover three topic areas: What is Engineering, The Language of Engineering and Engineering Means and Methods. The goals of the course are:

To help you understand the process that an engineer uses to analyze a structure, to provide an understanding of engineering terms so that you can clearly communicate with your engineer, and to introduce you to basic engineering concepts for static structures as a basis for further work in parts 2 through 4 of this series.

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Presenter: Shawn Nolan During his 35 plus year career, Shawn Nolan has worked extensively throughout the entertainment industry in the fields of stage technology, automation and rigging. His current focus is two-fold: standards compliance to ensure adherence to national and international standards, and structural and mechanical analysis and design for the entertainment industry. He has extensive experience with equipment and methods used by the entertainment industry for both mechanical and structural systems, including design experience for aluminum structures and mechanics for automated systems. Shawn attended Baldwin-Wallace College then worked primarily in regional theatre in the 70’s and 80’s. He received his BS in Engineering from the University of Cincinnati and has been a practicing structural engineer since. Shawn currently works for PRG as Head of Technical Engineering & Standards. He is a Licensed Professional Engineer in 8 states. Shawn is active in ESTA and in USITT. He is a member of the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME). He is an ETCP Certified Rigger Arena & Theatre and an ETCP Recognized Trainer. Shawn has contributed extensive time to the development of ESTA’s ANSI standards including powered rigging and outdoor structures. He worked extensively on the development of the ETCP Certified Rigger program, which he feels is one of his most significant achievements destined to have long-term impact on the entertainment industry.

 
 
 

Loads may not have changed but the way we evaluate them has. The entertainment industry has shifted away from relying on single, large factors of safety, instead applying appropriately smaller design factors to understood loads. In this session, the presenters will define terms such as characteristic, dynamic, and peak load, and they will demonstrate how these concepts are used in engineering calculations.

These principles form the basis for current entertainment machinery Standards. This session is part of the Engineering Commission's Mechanical Design Series with “Stage Machinery Brake Design and Selection" and “Emergency Stop Systems - How Safe is Safe Enough?”.

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Presenters:

Dan Lisowski Dan Lisowski is the Head of Theatre Technology/Assistant Professor at the University of Wisconsin - Madison where he mentors students and teaches courses in automation control design, mechanical design, structural design, creative problem solving, and technical direction. Dan's research interests include Network-based Safety-Critical Control Systems and other topics in Functional Safety Design. Dan serves as the Vice-Commissioner for Programming for USITT's Engineering Commission, is a voting member of PLASA's TSP Rigging and Control Protocol Working Groups, and was a member of the ANSI E1.43 "Performer Flying Systems" task group charged with writing the standard for our industry. Additionally, he operates a freelance entertainment design engineering firm, For The Stage, LLC, which specializes in automation control systems. Before rejoining academia, he served as Head of Electrical Design at Fisher Technical Services Inc. in Las Vegas and has worked with ZFX Flying Effects, Hudson Scenic Studio, and Chicago Scenic Studios.

John Van Arsdale John Van Arsdale is a Technical Designer at PRG Scenic Technologies, providing technical solutions for Broadway, Off-Broadway, touring and regional theater. He received his MFA in Theatre & Drama, emphasis in Theatre Technology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. While at UW, John concentrated his research on technical production and mechanical design. He presented his research on the effects of acceleration on the human body to the PLASA E1.43 Performer Flying Effects Task Group. John is a proud recipient of the USITT Young Designers & Technicians KM Fabrics Inc. Technical Production Award in 2015 and a strong supporter of USITT.

Joe Champelli Director of Mechanical Design (Entertainment Project Services, LLC): Joe began his career in Las Vegas working on large-scale Entertainment Automation projects such as the Pirate Battle at Treasure Island, the Siegfried and Roy Show and Cirque Du Soleil’s ‘O’ at Bellagio. Prior to joining EPS, Joe spent 5 years as General Manager and Lead Mechanical Designer for ZFX, Inc. and 11 years as Lead Mechanical Designer/VP/COO for Fisher Technical Services, Inc. Favorite past projects include Tinkerbell at Disneyland and two separate projects for NASA/JPL. As Director of Mechanical Design for Entertainment Project Services, LLC, Joe is enjoying tackling new and unique challenges. EPS’s project list includes projects for major theme parks in the US, domestic and international hotel/casino projects, cruise ships and a variety of Entertainment Rigging and Automation companies. Joe holds an MFA in Technical Production from Penn State University and a Bachelor’s of Science in Design from Illinois State University. In his free time, Joe enjoys, playing board games and throwing hatchets with his wife of 20 years and their three children.

 
 
 

A comparative analysis of flat production techniques. Which are the best for tall, wide or irregularly-shaped flats? What are the best ways to rig or move vertical scenery? These questions and more will be discussed.

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Presenters:

Mary Black is the Technical Director and an assistant professor at Millikin University in Decatur, Illinois, where she teaches classes in stagecraft, scenic construction, technical direction, and theatrical sound. She has an MFA in theatre technology from Indiana University, and was the 2009 recipient of the KM Fabrics, Inc. Technical Production award.

Scott Bartley is chair of the Theatre Department at Central Connecticut State University. On top of teaching two courses and running a department Bartley is also the Technical Director and Sound Designer for most of the department’s four shows a year.

 
 
 

Welding is a common practice in scenic construction, but what is required for welding of metals to be done safely in a typical production shop or onstage? Code requirements, hot work permits, and common sense must all be followed when planning and executing a welding operation as part of production operations. This session will start with the codes and expand their requirements to present best practices to be followed when welding. Training and welding certifications will be discussed with examples of practical means to obtain welding certifications applicable to the typical welding operations for scenery.

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Presenters:

David “Ross” Rauschkolb is Technical Director at Valencai College. Ross’ research centers on the use of technology for teaching, new material usage, uses of 3D technology, and interdisciplinary production design. He has recently presented for the Education and Health and Safety Commissions. He is a member of Actor’s Equity Association, Stage Manager’s Association, and the Association of Arts Administration Educators. Ross holds a MFA in Technical Direction from the University of Arizona and a BFA in Theatre Education from East Carolina University. He has worked professionally around the US, for companies such as Stage Light, Teatro Paraguas, DNA_Works, the Post Playhouse, Oklahoma CityRep, ECU Loessin Summer Theatre, Tricklock Theatre, Yjastros Flamenco Dance Company, the William Inge Center, Play Conservatory, RE Lee Auditorium, Oklahoma City University, Carolina Ballet, University of New Meixco, Oklahoma Children’s Theatre, Sonora Theatreworks, and Oklahoma Shakespeare in the Park.

Tony Brizius: Finishing up his fourth season as the Technical Director for the Cincinnati Playhouse in the Park, Troy A. Brizius began his career after graduating from the North Carolina School of the Arts with an MFA in Technical Direction. Technical Direction experience includes The Weston Playhouse (3 seasons), The John Houseman Acting Company (3 national tours), Goodspeed Musicals (2 seasons as ATD), and Surflight Theatre (2 seasons). Troy also served as an instructor in the Scenic Technology Department in the School of Design and Production at the University of North Carolina School for the Arts(UNCSA) for 5 years; teaching undergrad and graduate level classes, managing the scene shop, and serving as Production Manager for the UNCSA’s Summer Sessions in Manteo, NC. In addition to his duties of Technical Director at the Cincinnati Playhouse in the Park, Troy also chairs the Accident Investigation Committee and serves on the Safety Steering Committee. He is a Journeyman member of IATSE local 635.

 
 
 

A presentation for entry and intermediate level technicians that provides information on the proper use of fall protection safety harnesses, shock absorbing lanyards and self-retracting lifelines.

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 Presenter: Bill Sapsis President of Sapsis Rigging, Inc., Bill began his career in 1972. His work on Broadway includes the original productions of A Chorus Line and The Runner Stumbles. Bill opened Sapsis Rigging in 1981 and has grown the company into a multi-faceted installation/production/service company with clients on 5 continents. Bill’s articles and lectures on rigging and safety can be found in numerous publications worldwide. He has authored two books; Heads and Tales and Entertainment Rigging for the 21st Century. Bill is a member of the ETCP Council and Co-Chair of the Rigging Subject Matter Experts. He also serves on ESTA's Technical Standards Council and is Co-Chair of the Rigging Working Group. Bill is a member of the Behind the Scenes Foundation Board of Directors, is a USITT Fellow and a member of ABTT. He is a founding member of the Long Reach Long Riders, an industry based charity motorcycle group. Bill is also the producer of the North American Theatre Engineering and Architecture Conference.

 
 
 

.5 ETCP RENEWAL CREDIT Brakes in stage machinery are a tap-dance between having enough braking force to safely stop the load and too much braking force that would result in excessive dynamic forces. This session describes the various brake designs and current options in the market. A quick overview about how to dimension brakes for a specific machine and the special requirement for brakes in machines intended for performer flying.

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Presenters:

Joe Champelli Director of Mechanical Design (Entertainment Project Services, LLC): Joe began his career in Las Vegas working on large-scale Entertainment Automation projects such as the Pirate Battle at Treasure Island, the Siegfried and Roy Show and Cirque Du Soleil’s ‘O’ at Bellagio. Prior to joining EPS, Joe spent 5 years as General Manager and Lead Mechanical Designer for ZFX, Inc. and 11 years as Lead Mechanical Designer/VP/COO for Fisher Technical Services, Inc. Favorite past projects include Tinkerbell at Disneyland and two separate projects for NASA/JPL. As Director of Mechanical Design for Entertainment Project Services, LLC, Joe is enjoying tackling new and unique challenges. EPS’s project list includes projects for major theme parks in the US, domestic and international hotel/casino projects, cruise ships and a variety of Entertainment Rigging and Automation companies. Joe holds an MFA in Technical Production from Penn State University and a Bachelor’s of Science in Design from Illinois State University. In his free time, Joe enjoys, playing board games and throwing hatchets with his wife of 20 years and their three children.

Alan Hendrickson Alan Hendrickson has been teaching at the Yale School of Drama since 1979, Alan teaches graduate level courses in the physics of stage machinery, mechanical design, fluid power, control systems, electricity, and the history of theatre architecture. At the Yale Repertory Theatre he acts as Automation Supervisor overseeing the design and construction of mechanized scenic effects. With contributing author Colin Buckhurst, he wrote Mechanical Design for the Stage published by Focal Press in 2008. He also consults on control systems and machinery design for Hudson Scenic Studio, Inc. of New York.

Peter Svitavsky Peter V. Svitavsky worked as a stage carpenter and rigger before returning to school to earn a degree in mechanical engineering. For eighteen years he has been a member of the team at JR Clancy and enjoyed contributing to the projects that they undertake at venues around the world. He is proud to be among the members of PLASA working to develop national standards for the entertainment industry. Pete designs, builds, inspects and services equipment in places of entertainment wherever they may be. In his travels he has earned the license of a Professional Engineer, IATSE membership, a number of patents, a few scars, and some great friends. When he is not working on stage machinery you will find him with his family at home in the Finger Lakes, or prowling in the woods and fields of Upstate New York.

Michael Lichter Michael Lichter is Senior Technical Product Manager for Rigging Control Systems at Electronic Theatre Controls, Inc. He worked in the entertainment industry for over 25 and joined ETC 19 years ago. Since then he was based in the US-Middleton, London and German ETC offices, has worked on projects around the globe and was actively involved in the design of several ETC products. Michael holds a degree in electrical and software engineering from Germany’s Hamburg University of Applied Sciences. Michael oversees the various ETC rigging control systems since 2004. He is also actively involved in the US PLASA / ANSI, German DIN and European CEN standards writing processes.

 
 
 

The program reviews the requirements for emergency lighting control covered under the National Electrical Code® (NEC®), the associated UL Product Standards, and application and misapplication of products, and the newest requirements in the NEC®.

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Presenter: Mitch Hefter has been working in entertainment and architectural lighting controls for 38 years. He is currently Senior Systems Engineer at Philips Lighting. As a past Engineering Commissioner for USITT, Mitch oversaw the development of USITT DMX512. He is a USITT Fellow, USITT Founders Award recipient, an Honorary Lifetime member of USITT, and has also served on the USITT Board of Directors. Mitch is a founding member of the ANSI-accredited ESTA Technical Standards Program. He serves on the Technical Standards Council and co-chairs the Electrical Power Working Group. He is an ETCP Certified Entertainment Electrician and Recognized Electrical Trainer. Mitch has worked on updates to the National Electrical Code since 1981 and is a member of NEC Panel 15, representing the Illuminating Engineering Society (IES) since 1997. Mitch is a member of the IES Control Protocols Committee which developed IES TM-23 in 2011 and is the scribe for the revision to TM-23 expected in 2017. Additionally, he is a member of the Control Protocols sub-committee of the IES Energy Management Committee, responsible for LEM-7. He is also an Associate member of the International Association of Electrical Inspectors (IAEI).